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BOTTICELLI AND TREASURES FROM THE HAMILTON COLLECTION. Dagmar Korbacher. Berlin Kupferstichkabinett, 2016. Published by Paul Holberton Publishing, London. 168 pp. with 100 col. ills. 26 x 22 cm. ISBN 9781907372926 In English.
Publisher's description: In 1882 the Berlin Kupferstichkabinett (Prints and Drawings Museum) acquired, from the collection of the Duke of Hamilton, Sandro Botticelli's spectacular series of drawings on parchment illustrating scenes from Dante's 'Divine Comedy'. It also acquired nearly all the items in the duke's priceless collection of illuminated manuscripts. The wider British public only became aware of these masterpieces when rumours of the Berlin museum's attempts to woo the Scottish duke started circulating in the press. No less than Queen Victoria and her daughter, wife of the German crown prince, appealed for these treasures to remain in the UK. In spite of their efforts, the Berlin museum pulled off a sensational coup in acquiring the Hamilton collection. Since then the Botticelli drawings and the splendid Hamilton manuscripts have formed the cornerstone of the Kupferstichkabinett's collection and are regarded as amongst the very greatest treasures of the Berlin State Museums. Accompanying an exhibition that brings back to the UK some of the greatest of the former Hamilton treasures, this book includes no less than thirty of Botticelli's exquisite 'Dante drawings'.
Indexing: Western, Europe — Italy — 1400-1600 — Drawing and Watercolor, Manuscripts and Book Design
Plans: 73,02,04
Worldwide Number: 037022
Paperbound $40.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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