Title Information

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HOUSE AND HOME: CULTURAL CONTEXTS, ONTOLOGICAL ROLES. Thomas Barrie. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2017. 214 pp. with 51 ills. 23 x 16 cm. LC 2016-39811 ISBN 9781138947184 In English.
Hardcover edition also available; see Worldwide 175495. Publisher's description: House and home are words routinely used to describe where and how one lives. This book challenges predominant definitions and argues that domesticity fundamentally satisfies the human need to create and inhabit a defined place in the world. Consequently, house and home have performed numerous cultural and ontological roles, and have been assiduously represented in scripture, literature, art, and philosophy. This book presents how the search for home in an unpredictable world led people to create myths about the origins of architecture, houses for their gods, and house tombs for eternal life. Turning to more recent topics, it discusses how writers often used simple huts as a means to address the essentials of existence; modernist architects envisioned the capacity of house and home to improve society; and the suburban house was positioned as a superior setting for culture and family. Throughout the book, house and home are critically examined to illustrate the perennial role and capacity of architecture to articulate the human condition, position it more meaningfully in the world, and assist in our collective homecoming.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Several Periods — Architecture, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 73,55
Worldwide Number: 175496
Paperbound $39.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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