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A HOUSE IN THE SUN: MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND SOLAR ENERGY IN THE COLD WAR. Daniel Barber. Oxford University Press, 2016. 352 pp. ISBN 9780199394012 In English.
Due date: November 2016. Publisher's description: A House in the Sun describes a number of experiments in solar house heating in American architectural, engineering, political, economic, and corporate contexts from the beginning of World War II until the late 1950s. Houses were built across the Midwest, Northeast, and Southwestern United States, and also proposed for sites in India, South Africa, and Morocco. These experiments developed in parallel to transformations in the discussion of modern architecture, relying on new materials and design ideas for both energy efficiency and claims to cultural relevance. Architects were among the myriad cultural and scientific actors to see the solar house as an important designed element of the American future. These experiments also developed as part of a wider analysis of the globe as an interconnected geophysical system. Perceived resource limitations in the immediate postwar period led to new understandings of the relationship between energy, technology and economy. The solar house - both as a charged object in the milieu of suburban expansion, and as a means to raise the standard of living in developing economies - became an important site for social, technological, and design experimentation. This led to new forms of expertise in architecture and other professions.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 175286
Hardcover $39.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) Not Yet Published.

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