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THE IMPACT OF THE EDWARDIAN CASTLES IN WALES. Ed. by Diane Williams and John R. Kenyon. Oxbow Books, Oxford, 2017. Published in the U.S.A. by Oxbow Books, Philadelphia. 240 pp. with 120 ills. (16 col.). ISBN 9781785704697 In English.
Due date: January 2017. Publisher's description: The Impact of the Edwardian Castles in Wales publishes the proceedings of a conference held in 2007 - a year that marked the seventh centenary of the death of King Edward I - which set out to review recent scholarship on castles that he built in north Wales after two wars, in 1277 and 1282-83, and a Welsh uprising in 1294-95, and to rethink the effect that their building had upon Wales in the past, present and future. Building upon the seminal work of Arnold Taylor, whose study of the buildings and documentary evidence has been pivotal to Edwardian castle studies for more than fifty years, the volume includes papers which call into question the role of Master James of St George as the architect of the king's new castles; the role of Richard the Engineer, the nature of royal accommodation in the thirteenth century, and a detailed look at how households worked, especially in the kitchen and accounting departments. New approaches to castle studies are encouraging a more holistic understanding of the Edwardian castles and their context and to this end papers consider their impact on Welsh society and its princes in the thirteenth century, notably Llywelyn ab Iorwerth (Fawr , the Great) and his grandson, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 175187
Paperbound $55.00 Not Yet Published.

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