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THE ZOOMORPHIC IMAGINATION IN CHINESE ART AND CULTURE. Ed. by Jerome Silbergeld and Eugene Y. Wang. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, 2016. 472 pp. with 208 ills. (137 col.). 25 x 17 cm. LC 2015-21586 ISBN 9780824846763 In English.
Publisher's description: China has an age-old zoomorphic tradition. The First Emperor was famously said to have had the heart of a tiger and a wolf. The names of foreign tribes were traditionally written with characters that included animal radicals. In modern times, the communist government frequently referred to Nationalists as "running dogs," and President Xi Jinping, vowing to quell corruption at all levels, pledged to capture both "the tigers" and "the flies." Splendidly illustrated with works ranging from Bronze Age vessels to twentieth-century conceptual pieces, this volume is a wide-ranging look at zoomorphic and anthropomorphic imagery in Chinese art. The contributors, leading scholars in Chinese art history and related fields, consider depictions of animals not as simple, one-for-one symbolic equivalents: they pursue in depth, in complexity, and in multiple dimensions the ways that Chinese have used animals from earliest times to the present day to represent and rhetorically stage complex ideas about the world around them, examining what this means about China, past and present.
Indexing: Non-Western (Traditional/Native Arts), Asia (Traditional) — China — Several Media
Plans: 71,54,55
Worldwide Number: 174690
Hardcover $75.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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