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ART, CREATIVITY AND PSYCHOANALYSIS: PERSPECTIVES FROM ANALYST-ARTISTS. Ed. by George Hagman. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2016. 232 pp. with 58 ills. (8 col.). ISBN 9781138859128 In English.
Due date: December 2016. Hardcover edition also available; see Worldwide 174631. Publisher's description: Art, Creativity, and Psychoanalysis: Perspectives from Analyst-Artists collects personal reflections by therapists who are also professional artists. It explores the relationship between art and analysis through accounts by practitioners who identify themselves as dual-profession artists and analysts. The book illustrates the numerous areas where analysis and art share common characteristics using first-hand, in-depth accounts. These vivid reports from the frontier of art and psychoanalysis shed light on the day-to-day struggle to succeed at both of these demanding professions. From the beginning of psychoanalysis, many have made comparisons between analysis and art. Recently there has been increasing interest in the relationship between artistic and psychotherapeutic practices. Most important, both professions are viewed as highly creative with spontaneity, improvisation and aesthetic experience seeming to be common to each. However, differences have also been recognized, especially regarding the differing goals of each profession: art leading to the creation of an art work, and psychoanalysis resulting in the increased welfare and happiness of the patient.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 174632
Paperbound $52.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) Not Yet Published.

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