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MACHINE ART IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. Andreas Broeckmann. MIT Press, Cambridge, 2017. Leonardo. 408 pp. with 90 ills. (16 col.). 22 x 17 cm. ISBN 9780262035064 In English.
Due date: January 2017. Publisher's description: "Machine art" is neither a movement nor a genre, but encompasses diverse ways in which artists engage with technical systems. In this book, Andreas Broeckmann examines a variety of twentieth- and early twenty-first-century artworks that articulate people's relationships with machines. In the course of his investigation, Broeckmann traces historical lineages that connect art of different periods, looking for continuities that link works from the end of the century to developments in the 1950s and 1960s and to works by avant-garde artists in the 1910s and 1920s. An art historical perspective, he argues, might change our views of recent works that seem to be driven by new media technologies but that in fact continue a century-old artistic exploration. Broeckmann investigates critical aspects of machine aesthetics that characterized machine art until the 1960s and then turns to specific domains of artistic engagement with technology: algorithms and machine autonomy, looking in particular at the work of the Canadian artist David Rokeby; vision and image, and the advent of technical imaging; and the human body, using the work of the Australian artist Stelarc as an entry point to art that couples the machine to the body, mechanically or cybernetically.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 174287
Hardcover $45.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) Not Yet Published.

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