Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

BEAUTIFUL DECEPTIONS: EUROPEAN AESTHETICS, THE EARLY AMERICAN NOVEL AND ILLUSIONIST ART. Philipp Schweighauser. University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 2016. 256 pp. with 12 ills. 22 x 15 cm. ISBN 9780813939032 In English.
Publisher's description: The art of the early republic abounds in representations of deception: the villains of Gothic novels deceive their victims with visual and acoustic tricks; the ordinary citizens of picaresque novels are hoodwinked by quacks and illiterate but shrewd adventurers; and innocent sentimental heroines fall for their seducers' eloquently voiced half-truths and lies. Yet, as Philipp Schweighauser points out in˙Beautiful Deceptions,˙deception happens not only within these novels but also through them. The fictions of Charles Brockden Brown, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, Susanna Rowson, Hannah Webster Foster, Tabitha Gilman Tenney, and Royall Tyler invent worlds that do not exist. Similarly, Charles Willson Peale's and Raphaelle Peale's trompe l'oeil paintings trick spectators into mistaking them for the real thing, and Patience Wright's wax sculptures deceive (and disturb) viewers. Beautiful Deceptions˙examines how these and other artists of the era at times acknowledge art's dues to other social realms -- religion, morality, politics -- but at other times insist on artists' right to deceive their audiences, thus gesturing toward a more modern, autonomous notion of art that was only beginning to emerge in the eighteenth century.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 174011
Hardcover $45.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.