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WHY ON EARTH WOULD ANYONE BUILD THAT: MODERN ARCHITECTURE EXPLAINED. John Zukowsky. Prestel-Verlag, Munich, 2015. 222 pp. with 103 ills. (95 col.). 21 x 15 cm. LC 2015-729 ISBN 9783791381336 In English.
Publisher's description: This global examination of boundary-pushing architecture challenges our perceptions of how buildings ought to look -- and reveals how even the most unusual constructions can achieve iconic status. In this fascinating exploration of 100 controversial buildings, readers will discover not only how each building was constructed, but also the motivation behind its design, and the ensuing debates. Readers will learn why erecting the Longaberger Basket Company headquarters was no picnic; why the Guggenheim Museum in New York City inspired hate mail from artists who would later display their works there; and whether Chicago's Sears Tower or the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur won the "spire debate," officially becoming the world's tallest building. Thematically grouping these buildings into categories that reflect their most pronounced features, architectural historian John Zukowsky discusses each structure in detail, interweaving relevant biographical factors and sociocultural influences that impacted the architects' distinctive designs. The result is a lively, generously illustrated synthesis of diverse architectural values, and a fascinating look at the past century's most innovative architects.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-1945 — Architecture
Plans: 74,54
Worldwide Number: 173474
Flexible hardcover $18.95t (libraries receive a 20% discount on this title)    

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