Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

MATERIALITY AND ARCHITECTURE. Ed. by Sandra Karina Loschke. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2016. 278 pp. with 101 ills. 24 x 16 cm. LC 2015-39800 ISBN 9781138840652 In English.
Hardcover edition also available; see Worldwide 172485. Publisher's description: Once regarded a secondary consideration, in recent years, materiality has emerged as a powerful concept in architectural discourse and practice. Prompted in part by developments in digital fabrication and digital science, the impact of materiality on design and practice is being widely reassessed and reimagined. Materiality and Architecture extends architectural thinking beyond the confines of current design literatures to explore conceptions of materiality across the field of architecture. Fourteen international contributors use elucidate the problems and possibilities of materiality-based approaches in architecture from interdisciplinary perspectives. The book includes contributions from the professions of architecture, art, architectural history, theory and philosophy, including essays from Gernot Bohme, Jonathan Hill and Philip Ursprung. Important 'immaterial' aspects such as presentation, agency, ecology and concept are examined, deepening our understanding of materiality's role in architectural processes, the production of cultural identities, the pursuit of political agendas, and the staging of everyday environments and atmospheres.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-2000 — Architecture, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 172486
Paperbound $52.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.