Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

AQUATECTURE: BUILDINGS AND CITIES DESIGNED TO LIVE AND WORK WITH WATER. Robert Barker and Richard Coutts. RIBA Publishing, Royal Institute of British Architects, London, 2016. Distributed in the U.S.A. by Taylor & Francis Group, New York. 318 pp. with 383 ills. (339 col.). 19 x 26 cm. ISBN 9781859465318 In English.
Publisher's description: Water plays a vital role in shaping our built environment, as it has done for centuries. We depend on it, we use it, we live with it and we must respect it. Aquatecture is the first book to outline new ways of 'designing for water,' using examples from around the world to illustrate methods of utilizing water innovatively, efficiently and safely. The first part of the book explores the historical relationship between water and architecture, examining how cities and civilizations have been drawn to water and have attempted to control it. The chapters go on to assess how this relationship has changed over time, and introduce readers to a range of brand new techniques that will revolutionize the way we think about water, design and urban planning. Solutions such as amphibious housing, wet-proof buildings, zero carbon development, rain gardens, flood storage and new methods of waterfront design are discussed and their effectiveness assessed. Full color illustrations and international case studies are used throughout the book to bring these new theories to life; practical, technical advice sits alongside truly ground-breaking and ambitious ideas for the future.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-2000 — Architecture
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 172379
Paperbound $53.95    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.