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THE SITUATIONIST INTERNATIONAL IN BRITAIN: MODERNISM, SURREALISM AND THE AVANT-GARDES. Sam Cooper. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, 2016. Copyright 2017. Routledge Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature, 39. 196 pp. with 15 ills. 24 x 16 cm. LC 2016-13500 ISBN 9781138680456 In English.
Publisher's description: This book tells, for the first time, the story of the Situationist International's influence and afterlives in Britain, where its radical ideas have been rapturously welcomed and fiercely resisted. The Situationist International presented itself as the culmination of the twentieth century avant-garde tradition -- as the true successor of Dada and Surrealism. Its grand ambition was not unfounded. Though it dissolved in 1972, generations of artists and writers, theorists and provocateurs, punks and psychogeographers have continued its effort to confront and contest the 'society of the spectacle.' This book constructs a long cultural history, beginning in the interwar period with the arrival of Surrealism to Britain, moving through the countercultures of the 1950s and 1960s, and finally surveying the directions in which Situationist theory and practice are being taken today. It combines agile historicism with close readings of a vast range of archival and newly excavated materials, including newspaper reports, underground pamphlets, Psychogeographical films, and experimental novels.
Indexing: Western, Europe — Great Britain — 1900-1945, Post-1945 — Several Media, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 73,55
Worldwide Number: 172211
Hardcover $140.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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