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CITY SQUARES: EIGHTEEN WRITERS ON THE SPIRIT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF SQUARES AROUND THE WORLD. Catie Marron. Harper, HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., New York, 2016. 304 pp. ISBN 9780062380203 In English.
Publisher's description: In this important collection, eighteen renowned writers, including David Remnick, Zadie Smith, Rebecca Skloot, Rory Stewart, and Adam Gopnik evoke the spirit and history of some of the world's most recognized and significant city squares, accompanied by illustrations from equally distinguished photographers. Over half of the world's citizens now live in cities, and this number is rapidly growing. At the heart of these municipalities is the square the defining urban public space since the dawn of democracy in Ancient Greece. Each square stands for a larger theme in history: cultural, geopolitical, anthropological, or architectural, and each of the eighteen luminary writers has contributed his or her own innate talent, prodigious research, and local knowledge. Divided into three parts: Culture, Geopolitics, History, headlined by Michael Kimmelman, David Remnick, and George Packer, this significant anthology shows the city square in new light. Jehane Noujaim, award-winning filmmaker, takes the reader through her return to Tahrir Square during the 2011 protest; Rory Stewart, diplomat and author, chronicles a square in Kabul which has come and gone several times over five centuries; Ari Shavit describes the dramatic changes of central Tel Aviv's Rabin Square.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 70
Worldwide Number: 171842
Hardcover $32.50t (libraries receive a 20% discount on this title)    

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