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RICHARD SAPPER. Ed. by Jonathan Olivares. Phaidon Press Limited, London, 2016. 238 pp. with 316 ills. (173 col.). 26 x 22 cm. ISBN 9780714871202 In English.
Publisher's description: Richard Sapper (1932-2015) a German-born designer who was based in Milan most of his working career, is considered one of the most important designers of his generation. Within his lifetime, he received numerous international design accolades, including ten prestigious Compasso d'Oro awards. Sapper developed and designed a wide variety of products, ranging from ships and cars, to computers and electronics as well as furniture and kitchen appliances. His clients included Alessi, Artemide, B&B Italia, Brionvega, FIAT, Heuer, Kartell, Knoll, IBM, Lenovo, Lorenz Milano, Magis, Molteni, Pirelli and many others. Based on over forty hours of interviews with the designer, Jonathan Olivares studies Sapper's objects, the circumstances that shaped them and the resulting ideals that emerged. The inter-generational conversation explores themes that reoccur throughout Sapper's oeuvre, and which have a particular importance for a younger generation of designers and those with a desire to understand Sapper's work from a fresh perspective. An illustrated timeline, packed with images from Sapper's personal archives, reveals the incredible variety and technical brilliance of his work. Richard Sapper died in Milan on 31 December 2015.
Artist(s):Sapper, Richard
Indexing: Western, Europe — Germany — Post-1945 — Commercial/Industrial Design
Plans: 70,54
Worldwide Number: 171827
Hardcover $95.00t (libraries receive a 20% discount on this title)    

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