Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

OBSOLESCENCE: AN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY. Daniel M. Abramson. University of Chicago Press, 2016. 202 pp. with 68 ills. 24 x 16 cm. LC 2015-17854 ISBN 9780226313450 In English.
Publisher's description: In our architectural pursuits, we often seem to be in search of something newer, grander, or more efficient -- and this phenomenon is not novel. In the spring of 1910 hundreds of workers labored day and night to demolish the Gillender Building in New York, once the loftiest office tower in the world, in order to make way for a taller skyscraper. The New York Times puzzled over those who would sacrifice the thirteen-year-old structure, "as ruthlessly as though it were some ancient shack." In New York alone, the Gillender joined the original Grand Central Terminal, the Plaza Hotel, the Western Union Building, and the Tower Building on the list of just one generation's razed metropolitan monuments. In the innovative and wide-ranging Obsolescence, Daniel M. Abramson investigates this notion of architectural expendability and the logic by which buildings lose their value and utility. The idea that the new necessarily outperforms and makes superfluous the old, Abramson argues, helps people come to terms with modernity and capitalism's fast-paced change. Obsolescence, then, gives an unsettling experience purpose and meaning. Belief in obsolescence, as Abramson shows, also profoundly affects architectural design.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-1945 — Architecture, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 171011
Hardcover $35.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.