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GOWANUS WATERS: STEVEN HIRSCH. Jordan G. Teicher. PowerHouse Books, Brooklyn, 2016. Distributed by Penguin Random House LLC, New York. 156 pp. with 75 col. ills. and 74 col. reference ills. 25 x 28 cm. LC 2015-955316 ISBN 9781576877920 In English.
Publisher's description: The Gowanus Canal is a 1.8-mile-long waterway connecting Upper New York Bay (the bay in between Brooklyn, Manhattan, New Jersey, and Staten Island) with the formerly industrial interior of Brooklyn. Originally it was fed by the marshland and freshwater springs in Brooklyn and drained into the Atlantic Ocean in Upper New York Bay. Because of the way it was created, though, it has become stagnant and polluted by decades of runoff and dumping from local neighborhoods and businesses. In the summer, you can smell it from blocks away. It's not a good smell, but that doesn't deter photographer Steven Hirsch, who finds all kinds of beauty in what floats upon the surface. Steven Hirsch grew up in Brooklyn in the late 1940s and 50s when Brooklyn was filled with a new middle class. Brooklyn was a paradise and he knew practically the whole borough, except for the Gowanus Canal. It was not until 2010 when a friend took him Hirsch there for the first time that he witnessed the famously polluted and now EPA Superfund waterway. When one thinks of canals they usually picture tree-lined waterways bustling with commercial activity. Not so with the present-day Gowanus.
Artist(s):Hirsch, Steven
Indexing: Western — United States — Post-2000 — Photography
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 170881
Hardcover $45.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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