Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON CRITICAL ARCHITECTURE: PRAXIS RELOADED. Ed. by Gevork Hartoonian. Ashgate Publishing, Farnham/Burlington, 2015. Ashgate Studies in Architecture. 246 pp. with 30 ills. 25 x 18 cm. LC 2015-11092 ISBN 9781472438133 In English.
Publisher's description: Judging from the debates taking place in both education and practice, it appears that architecture is deeply in crisis. New design and production techniques, together with the globalization of capital and even skilled-labour, have reduced architecture to a commodified object, its aesthetic qualities tapping into the current pervasive desire for the spectacular. These developments have changed the architect's role in the design and production processes of architecture. Moreover, critical architectural theories, including those of Breton, Heidegger and Benjamin, which explored the concepts of technology, modernism, labour and capital and how technology informed the cultural, along with later theories from the 1960s, which focused more on the architect's theorization of his/her own design strategies, seem increasingly irrelevant. In an age of digital reproduction and commodification, these theoretical approaches need to be reassessed. Bringing together essays and interviews from leading scholars such as Kenneth Frampton, Peggy Deamer, Bernard Tschumi, Donald Kunze and Marco Biraghi, this volume investigates and critically addresses various dimensions of the present crisis of architecture.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-2000 — Architecture, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 170556
Hardcover $119.95    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.