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HOW TO TALK ABOUT VIDEO GAMES. Ian Bogost. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 2015. Electronic Mediations, 47. 216 pp. 22 x 14 cm. ISBN 9780816699124 In English.
Hardcover edition also available; see Worldwide 169570. Publisher's description: Videogames! Aren't they the medium of the twenty-first century? The new cinema? The apotheosis of art and entertainment, the realization of Wagnerian gesamtkunstwerk? The final victory of interaction over passivity? No, probably not. Games are part art and part appliance, part tableau and part toaster. In "How to Talk about Videogames," leading critic Ian Bogost explores this paradox more thoroughly than any other author to date. Delving into popular, familiar games like "Flappy Bird, Mirror's Edge, Mario Kart, Scribblenauts, Ms. Pac-Man, FarmVille, Candy Crush Saga, Bully, Medal of Honor, Madden NFL," and more, Bogost posits that videogames are as much like appliances as they are like art and media. We don't watch or read games like we do films and novels and paintings, nor do we perform them like we might dance or play football or Frisbee. Rather, we do something in-between with games. Games are devices we operate, so game critique is both serious cultural currency and self-parody. It is about figuring out what it means that a game works the way it does and then treating the way it works as if it were reasonable, when we know it isn't.
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-1990 — Electronic Media/Computer Art, Criticism/Theory
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 169571
Paperbound $19.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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