Title Information

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HR GIGER. Benedikt Taschen Verlag GmbH, Cologne, 2015. 40 x 30 cm. ISBN 9783836542241 Trilingual in English, French and German.
This title is offered as a special-order item. Publisher's description: Swiss artist HR Giger (1930 2014) is most famous for his creation of the space monster in Ridley Scott's 1979 horror sci-fi film Alien, which earned him an Oscar. In retrospect, this was just one of the most popular expressions of Giger's biomechanical arsenal of creatures, which merged hybrids of human and machine, imprisoned luscious bodies in womblike apparatuses, and painted demons inspired by both gothic literature or his own nightmares. These images gave expression to the collective fears and fantasies of his age: fear of the atom, of pollution and wasted resources, and of a future in which our bodies depend on machines for survival. The vibe is a dark psychedelia, inspired by William S. Burroughs or Giger's friend Timothy Leary as much as by Poe and Lovecraft. In their visionary power, they draw on demons of the past, as well as evoking mythologies for the future. Begun shortly before the artist's unexpected death, this huge monograph pays homage to Giger's unique vision. It shows the complete story of his life and art, his sculptures, the film works and iconic album covers as well as the heritage he has left us in his own artist's museum and cafe in the Swiss Alps. In an in-depth essay, Giger scholar Andreas J. Hirsch plunges into the themes of Giger's oeuvre and his world.
Artist(s):Giger, HR
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 169134
Hardcover $150.00 nota bene: See Comment Above.

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