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DATA-DRIVEN GRAPHIC DESIGN: CREATIVE CODING FOR VISUAL COMMUNICATION. Andrew Richardson. Fairchild Books, Bloomsbury Publishing, New York, 2016. 198 pp. with 324 ills. (217 col.). 27 x 21 cm. LC 2015-8891 ISBN 9781472578303 In English.
Publisher's description: Digital technology has not only revolutionized the way designers work, but also the kinds of designs they produce. The development of the computer as a design environment has encouraged a new breed of digital designer. Data-driven Graphic Design introduces the creative potential of computational data and how it can be used to inform and create everything from typography, print and moving graphics to interactive design and physical installations. Using code as a creative environment allows designers to step outside the boundaries of commercial software tools, and create a set of unique, digitally informed pieces of work. The use of code offers a new way of thinking about and creating design for the digital environment. Each chapter outlines key concepts and techniques, before exploring a range of innovative projects through case studies and interviews with artists and designers. These provide an inspirational, real-world context for every technique. Finally each chapter concludes with a Code section, guiding you through the process of experimenting with each technique yourself (with sample projects and code examples using the popular Processing language supplied online to get you started).
Indexing: Western, International (Western Style) — Post-2000 — Electronic Media/Computer Art, Graphic Design
Plans: 73,54
Worldwide Number: 169096
Paperbound $68.95    

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