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SAVANNAH: THEN AND NOW. Polly Cooper. Pavilion Books Company Ltd., London, 2015. Distributed in the U.S.A. by Trafalgar Square Publishing, North Pomfret. 144 pp. 24 x 27 cm. ISBN 9781910496565 In English.
This title is offered as a special-order item. Publisher's description: Exquisite archival images are paired with the same views as they look today The early settlers of Savannah built their houses around a geometric street plan on a bluff above the Savannah River. They were aided by the Yamacraw tribe and their aged chief, Tomochichi, who became firm friends with Savannah's founder, Englishman James Oglethorpe, and both their names are commemorated across the city. Oglethorpe's vision for "open-space squares surrounded by the rhythmic placement of streets" would later earn Savannah the prestigious status of becoming a National Historic Landmark. Savannah boomed as the cotton trade expanded in the South, and by the mid-19th century the city was thriving as it exported cotton bales to Europe and acted as a staging post for travelers. During the Civil War, in 1864, Savannah was surrendered to General William T. Sherman following his March to the Sea, which began in Atlanta and ended in Savannah. Thankfully, General Sherman spared Savannah the torch, and the elegant Georgian residences were saved. However, it took a group of resolute Savannah ladies to preserve some of the best architecture in the city in the 1950s, as many historic buildings were scheduled for demolition.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 168689
Hardcover $19.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) nota bene: See Comment Above.

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