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DRESSING FOR THE CULTURE WARS: STYLE AND THE POLITICS OF SELF-PRESENTATION IN THE 1960S AND 1970S. Betty Luther Hillman. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 2015. 278 pp. with 17 ills. 24 x 16 cm. LC 2015-17201 ISBN 9780803269750 In English.
Publisher's description: Style of dress has always been a way for Americans to signify their politics, but perhaps never so overtly as in the 1960s and 1970s. Whether participating in presidential campaigns or Vietnam protests, hair and dress provided a powerful cultural tool for social activists to display their politics to the world and became both the cause and a symbol of the rift in American culture. Some Americans saw stylistic freedom as part of their larger political protests, integral to the ideals of self-expression, sexual freedom, and equal rights for women and minorities. Others saw changes in style as the erosion of tradition and a threat to the established social and gender norms at the heart of family and nation. Through the lens of fashion and style, Dressing for the Culture Wars guides us through the competing political and social movements of the 1960s and 1970s. Although long hair on men, pants and miniskirts on women, and other hippie styles of self-fashioning could indeed be controversial, Betty Luther Hillman illustrates how self-presentation influenced the culture and politics of the era and carried connotations similarly linked to the broader political challenges of the time.
Indexing: Western — United States — Post-1945 — Costume/Fashion
Plans: 71,30
Worldwide Number: 167796
Hardcover $40.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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