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TOPOGRAPHICAL STORIES: STUDIES IN LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURE. Reprint. David Leatherbarrow. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2015. Penn Studies in Landscape Architecture. Original edition published 2004 {Worldwide 116213}. 296 pp. ISBN 9780812223507 In English.
This title is offered as a special-order item. Publisher's description: Landscape architecture and architecture are two fields that exist in close proximity to one another. Some have argued that the two are, in fact, one field. Others maintain that the disciplines are distinct. These designations are a subject of continual debate by theorists and practitioners alike. Here, David Leatherbarrow offers an entirely new way of thinking of architecture and landscape architecture. Moving beyond partisan arguments, he shows how the two disciplines rely upon one another to form a single framework of cultural meaning. Leatherbarrow redefines landscape architecture and architecture as topographical arts, the shared task of which is to accommodate and express the patterns of our lives. Topography, in his view, incorporates terrain, built and unbuilt, but also traces of practical affairs, by means of which culture preserves and renews its typical situations and institutions. This rigorous argument is supported by nearly 100 illustrations, as well as examples of topography from the sixteenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, through the heroic period of early modernism, to more recent offerings.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 167247
Paperbound $29.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) nota bene: See Comment Above.

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