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THE PARADOX OF BODY, BUILDING AND MOTION IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLAND. Kimberley Skelton. Manchester University Press, 2015. Rethinking Art's Histories. Distributed by Oxford University Press. 204 pp. with 60 ills. 25 x 16 cm. ISBN 9780719095801 In English.
Publisher's description: This book examines how seventeenth-century English architectural theorists and designers rethought the domestic built environment in terms of mobility as motion became a dominant mode of articulating the world across discourses encompassing philosophy, political theory, poetry, and geography. It offers a holistic synthesis of the spaces of English domestic architecture in an interdisciplinary context that reveals the visual and cultural assumptions underpinning both the seventeenth-century turn to motion, noted by Deleuze and others, and recent art historical study of early modern sensory experience. From the early-seventeenth-century house with its staccato physical and social rhythms to the late-seventeenth-century house with its long vistas and changeable wall surfaces, owners and guests moved through spatial complexes increasingly intertwined in networks of circulation. Arguments across philosophy, poetry, and etiquette manuals reveal the inherent human malleability and mobility assumed by designers of these spaces, while books on colonisation, travel, and geography highlight the broader networks of motion in which early modern viewers lived.
Indexing: Western, Europe — Great Britain — 1600-1800 — Architecture
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 166170
Hardcover $105.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

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