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THE LYRICAL IN EPIC TIME: MODERN CHINESE INTELLECTUALS AND ARTISTS THROUGH THE 1949 CRISIS. David Der-wei Wang. Columbia University Press, New York, 2014. 528 pp. ISBN 9780231170468 In English.
This title is offered as a special-order item. Publisher's description: Although the lyrical may seem like an unusual form for representing China's social and political crises in the mid-twentieth century, David Der-wei Wang contends that national cataclysm and mass movements intensified Chinese lyricism in extraordinary ways. He calls attention to the vigor and variety of Chinese lyricism at an unlikely historical juncture and the precarious consequences it brought about: betrayal, self-abjuration, suicide, and silence. Above all, he ponders the relevance of such a lyrical calling of the past century to our time. The writers, artists, and intellectuals discussed in this book all took lyricism as a way to explore selfhood in relation to solidarity, the role of the artist in history, and the potential for poetry to illuminate crisis. They experimented with poetry, fiction, intellectual treatise, political manifesto, film, theater, painting, calligraphy, and music. Wang's expansive research also traces the invocation of the lyrical in the work of contemporary Western critics. From their contested theoretical and ideological stances, Martin Heidegger, Theodor Adorno, Cleanth Brooks, Paul de Man, and many others used lyricism to critique their perilous, epic time.
Indexing: Unspecified
Plans: 71
Worldwide Number: 163350
Hardcover $60.00x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title) nota bene: See Comment Above.

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