Title Information

Records for not-yet-published titles do not include subject classifications. To initiate an order, see the instructions at the bottom of the page.

PHILADELPHIA: THEN AND NOW. Revised edition. Ed Mauger and Bob Skiba. Salamander Books Limited, Pavilion Books Company Ltd., London, 2014. Original edition published 2002. Distributed in the U.S.A. by Trafalgar Square Publishing, North Pomfret. 144 pp. with 207 ills. (83 col.) and 18 reference ills. 25 x 29 cm. ISBN 9781909815568 In English.
Publisher's description: Extensively revised from the original version with new sites, new text, and additional photos of local landmarks as they once looked, alongside the same viewpoint photographed today Philadelphia has Athens to thank for its classical structure, London for its Georgian and Victorian treasures, Paris for its grand boulevard, and William Penn for its name. Translated from the Greek, Philadelphia means "City of Brotherly Love." Ben Franklin's guiding hand also appears, the great polymath was involved in the world's first lending library and America's first hospital, medical school, think tank, and nondenominational college. This book pairs rare old archive images with modern views to show how the city has fared since the 19th and 20th centuries. Locations include Betsy Ross House, Elfreth's Alley, London Coffee House, Reading Terminal, Wannamakers, Poe House, Carpenter's Hall, Second Bank, Bourse Building, Masonic Temple, Eastern State Penitentiary, Philadelphia Waterworks, Fairmount Park, University of Philadelphia, Shibe Park, League Island, Penn Cottage, and Girard College.
Indexing: Western — United States — Several Periods — Architecture
Plans: 73
Worldwide Number: 162657
Hardcover $19.95x (libraries receive a 10% discount on this title)    

Select titles for ordering by clicking in the boxes to the left of the title entries and then click on the "Add to Cart" button below. You will then be able to specify quantities and continue with your order.

NOTE: The shopping cart will expire after 2 hours of inactivity.